Radiation therapy is both effective against cancer and gentle on the animals. On the same day, horses,

dogs and cats are back on their feet again and as active as ever.

Radiation therapy in
cancer treatment

Veterinarians can treat a tumour in several ways. The optimal therapy depends on the type of cancer. In addition to surgery, it is also possible to consider chemotherapy, hormone therapy or radiation therapy as performed at EQUINOX HEALTHCARE.

Often it makes sense to combine different treatment methods in order to defeat cancer. For example, veterinarians can initially remove the largest part of a tumour on the operating table and then irradiate the area to ensure that no malignant cells remain. 

GENTLE AND PAINLESS

Radiation therapy is painless for your animal and only takes a few minutes. This is how the technique works: photon or electron radiation from the linear accelerator damages the genetic material of the cancer cells so that they die directly or are no longer able to reproduce. To ensure that healthy tissue is spared, our veterinarians direct the rays at the tumour with millimetre precision and carefully shield the surrounding area. Three-dimensional irradiation plans or custom-made metal shields are used for this purpose. To ensure that the animal lies still during radiation treatment, it is given a short anaesthesia.

Radiation therapy in ten steps

This is how irradiation works for a horse:

Step 01
For the duration of the treatment, the animal "lives" in our stable in a bright, spacious box.
Step 02
When the treatment session is pending, it is first given a sedative in the stable. Then two helpers lead the horse into the clinic building.
Step 03
A veterinarian subsequently injects the anaesthetic. Once it takes effect, many helping hands will make sure that your horse does not hurt itself when it lies down. This procedure takes place in a safe lie-down area.
Step 04
Now a few preparations follow: earplugs shield the animal from noise so that it is not frightened when it wakes up. Eye ointment keeps the eyes moist because the animal cannot blink under the anaesthetic.
Step 05
With the help of a crane, which can carry a load of two tons, we now gently transport the sleeping horse on to a special table where it is comfortably deposited.
Step 06
The table can be rolled so that we can push it together with the horse into the room where the linear accelerator is located. The veterinarians now align it precisely with the tumour, taking great care to protect surrounding tissue from the radiation.
Step 07
When everything is ready, all the people leave the room and close the gate behind them.
Step 08
The irradiation only takes a few minutes, after which the door opens at the push of a button.
Step 09
With the crane, the horse is now moved into one of the wake-up boxes, where it will regain consciousness within the next half hour. The walls of the box are thickly padded so that the animal is optimally protected.
Step 10
As soon as the horse wakes up and is able to walk, helpers lead it back to its box.
Voriger
Nächster

On an individual basis, our veterinarians decide on the necessary number of irradiation units, the dose level and the penetration depth of the rays, depending on the type and size of the tumour and also on the part of the body where it is located. 

No. Many owners fear that their animal may be radioactive after treatment at EQUINOX HEALTHCARE and that radiation may remain, for example, in the urine. This, however, is not the case. 

When the animal wakes up from the anaesthesia and is back on its feet, everything is as before - except that the tumour cells have suffered damage.

Usually, several irradiation units are required. How many exactly depends on the type and location of the tumour. Equine sarcoid, for example, is treated in six sessions, which take place once a day. If the cancer is located close to the eye, our veterinarians reduce the individual radiation dose to protect the eye; they set more appointments to achieve a dose that will cause lasting damage to the tumour. In the case of cancer in comparatively uncomplicated body parts without sensitive organs in the immediate vicinity, the individual dose may be higher - so that, for example, only three radiation sessions may be necessary.

Radiation therapy itself hardly stresses your animal. Only the necessary anaesthesia has a short-term effect on the organism, while the side effects of radiation therapy are locally restricted. Possible undesirable consequences of radiation therapy, which, however, rarely occur, are a partial loss of coat, redness similar to sunburn or, if the cancer is in the eye, clouding of the lens. Treatment success is usually seen a few weeks or months after radiation therapy. Only in individual cases is a result already visible during the therapy.

Equipment

EVERYTHING IS ONE SIZE BIGGER

To irradiate an animal the size of a horse, a clinic must be specially equipped: The doors and tables must be significantly larger than in facilities for human patients or small animals. In addition to a crane used to transport the anaesthetised horse, padded recovery boxes are required in which equine patients can wake up with a minimum risk of injury. 

EQUINOX HEALTHCARE, the oncological centre in Linsengericht, Hessen, has all this equipment available, as our facility is specially designed for horses.

Please feel free
to contact us!

Radiation therapy
in cancer treatment

Radiation therapy is both effective against cancer and gentle on the animals. On the same day, horses, dogs and cats are back on their feet again and as active as ever.

Veterinarians can treat a tumour in several ways. The optimal therapy depends on the type of cancer. In addition to surgery, it is also possible to consider chemotherapy, hormone therapy or radiation therapy as performed at EQUINOX HEALTHCARE.

Often it makes sense to combine different treatment methods in order to defeat cancer. For example, veterinarians can initially remove the largest part of a tumour on the operating table and then irradiate the area to ensure that no malignant cells remain. 

GENTLE & PAINLESS

Radiation therapy is painless for your animal and only takes a few minutes. This is how the technique works: photon or electron radiation from the linear accelerator damages the genetic material of the cancer cells so that they die directly or are no longer able to reproduce. To ensure that healthy tissue is spared, our veterinarians direct the rays at the tumour with millimetre precision and carefully shield the surrounding area. Three-dimensional irradiation plans or custom-made metal shields are used for this purpose. To ensure that the animal lies still during radiation treatment, it is given a short anaesthesia.

Radiation therapy
in ten steps

This is how irradiation works for a horse:

Step 01
For the duration of the treatment, the animal "lives" in our stable in a bright, spacious box.
Step 02
When the treatment session is pending, it is first given a sedative in the stable. Then two helpers lead the horse into the clinic building.
Step 03
A veterinarian subsequently injects the anaesthetic. Once it takes effect, many helping hands will make sure that your horse does not hurt itself when it lies down. This procedure takes place in a safe lie-down area.
Step 04
Now a few preparations follow: earplugs shield the animal from noise so that it is not frightened when it wakes up. Eye ointment keeps the eyes moist because the animal cannot blink under the anaesthetic.
Step 05
With the help of a crane, which can carry a load of two tons, we now gently transport the sleeping horse on to a special table where it is comfortably deposited.
Step 06
The table can be rolled so that we can push it together with the horse into the room where the linear accelerator is located. The veterinarians now align it precisely with the tumour, taking great care to protect surrounding tissue from the radiation.
Step 07
When everything is ready, all the people leave the room and close the gate behind them.
Step 08
The irradiation only takes a few minutes, after which the door opens at the push of a button.
Step 09
With the crane, the horse is now moved into one of the wake-up boxes, where it will regain consciousness within the next half hour. The walls of the box are thickly padded so that the animal is optimally protected.
Step 10
As soon as the horse wakes up and is able to walk, helpers lead it back to its box.
Voriger
Nächster

On an individual basis, our veterinarians decide on the necessary number of irradiation units, the dose level and the penetration depth of the rays, depending on the type and size of the tumour and also on the part of the body where it is located. 

No. Many owners fear that their animal may be radioactive after treatment at EQUINOX HEALTHCARE and that radiation may remain, for example, in the urine. This, however, is not the case. 

When the animal wakes up from the anaesthesia and is back on its feet, everything is as before - except that the tumour cells have suffered damage.

Usually, several irradiation units are required. How many exactly depends on the type and location of the tumour. Equine sarcoid, for example, is treated in six sessions, which take place once a day. If the cancer is located close to the eye, our veterinarians reduce the individual radiation dose to protect the eye; they set more appointments to achieve a dose that will cause lasting damage to the tumour. In the case of cancer in comparatively uncomplicated body parts without sensitive organs in the immediate vicinity, the individual dose may be higher - so that, for example, only three radiation sessions may be necessary.

Radiation therapy itself hardly stresses your animal. Only the necessary anaesthesia has a short-term effect on the organism, while the side effects of radiation therapy are locally restricted. Possible undesirable consequences of radiation therapy, which, however, rarely occur, are a partial loss of coat, redness similar to sunburn or, if the cancer is in the eye, clouding of the lens. Treatment success is usually seen a few weeks or months after radiation therapy. Only in individual cases is a result already visible during the therapy. 

Equipment

EVERYTHING IS ONE SIZE BIGGER

To irradiate an animal the size of a horse, a clinic must be specially equipped: The doors and tables must be significantly larger than in facilities for human patients or small animals. In addition to a crane used to transport the anaesthetised horse, padded recovery boxes are required in which equine patients can wake up with a minimum risk of injury. 

EQUINOX HEALTHCARE, the oncological centre in Linsengericht, Hessen, has all this equipment available, as our facility is specially designed for horses.

Please feel
free to
contact us!

Radiation therapy in
cancer treatment

Radiation therapy is both effective against cancer and gentle on the animals. On the same day, horses, dogs and cats are back on their feet again and as active as ever.

Veterinarians can treat a tumour in several ways. The optimal therapy depends on the type of cancer. In addition to surgery, it is also possible to consider chemotherapy, hormone therapy or radiation therapy as performed at EQUINOX HEALTHCARE.

Often it makes sense to combine different treatment methods in order to defeat cancer. For example, veterinarians can initially remove the largest part of a tumour on the operating table and then irradiate the area to ensure that no malignant cells remain. 

GENTLE & PAINLESS

Radiation therapy is painless for your animal and only takes a few minutes. This is how the technique works: photon or electron radiation from the linear accelerator damages the genetic material of the cancer cells so that they die directly or are no longer able to reproduce. To ensure that healthy tissue is spared, our veterinarians direct the rays at the tumour with millimetre precision and carefully shield the surrounding area. Three-dimensional irradiation plans or custom-made metal shields are used for this purpose. To ensure that the animal lies still during radiation treatment, it is given a short anaesthesia.

Radiation therapy
in ten steps

This is how irradiation works for a horse:

Step 01
For the duration of the treatment, the animal "lives" in our stable in a bright, spacious box.
Step 02
When the treatment session is pending, it is first given a sedative in the stable. Then two helpers lead the horse into the clinic building.
Step 03
A veterinarian subsequently injects the anaesthetic. Once it takes effect, many helping hands will make sure that your horse does not hurt itself when it lies down. This procedure takes place in a safe lie-down area.
Step 04
Now a few preparations follow: earplugs shield the animal from noise so that it is not frightened when it wakes up. Eye ointment keeps the eyes moist because the animal cannot blink under the anaesthetic.
Step 05
With the help of a crane, which can carry a load of two tons, we now gently transport the sleeping horse on to a special table where it is comfortably deposited.
Step 06
The table can be rolled so that we can push it together with the horse into the room where the linear accelerator is located. The veterinarians now align it precisely with the tumour, taking great care to protect surrounding tissue from the radiation.
Step 07
When everything is ready, all the people leave the room and close the gate behind them.
Step 08
The irradiation only takes a few minutes, after which the door opens at the push of a button.
Step 09
With the crane, the horse is now moved into one of the wake-up boxes, where it will regain consciousness within the next half hour. The walls of the box are thickly padded so that the animal is optimally protected.
Step 10
As soon as the horse wakes up and is able to walk, helpers lead it back to its box.

On an individual basis, our veterinarians decide on the necessary number of irradiation units, the dose level and the penetration depth of the rays, depending on the type and size of the tumour and also on the part of the body where it is located. 

No. Many owners fear that their animal may be radioactive after treatment at EQUINOX HEALTHCARE and that radiation may remain, for example, in the urine. This, however, is not the case. 

When the animal wakes up from the anaesthesia and is back on its feet, everything is as before - except that the tumour cells have suffered damage.

Usually, several irradiation units are required. How many exactly depends on the type and location of the tumour. Equine sarcoid, for example, is treated in six sessions, which take place once a day. If the cancer is located close to the eye, our veterinarians reduce the individual radiation dose to protect the eye; they set more appointments to achieve a dose that will cause lasting damage to the tumour. In the case of cancer in comparatively uncomplicated body parts without sensitive organs in the immediate vicinity, the individual dose may be higher - so that, for example, only three radiation sessions may be necessary.

Radiation therapy itself hardly stresses your animal. Only the necessary anaesthesia has a short-term effect on the organism, while the side effects of radiation therapy are locally restricted. Possible undesirable consequences of radiation therapy, which, however, rarely occur, are a partial loss of coat, redness similar to sunburn or, if the cancer is in the eye, clouding of the lens. Treatment success is usually seen a few weeks or months after radiation therapy. Only in individual cases is a result already visible during the therapy. 

Equipment

EVERYTHING IS ONE SIZE BIGGER

To irradiate an animal the size of a horse, a clinic must be specially equipped: The doors and tables must be significantly larger than in facilities for human patients or small animals. In addition to a crane used to transport the anaesthetised horse, padded recovery boxes are required in which equine patients can wake up with a minimum risk of injury. 

EQUINOX HEALTHCARE, the oncological centre in Linsengericht, Hessen, has all this equipment available, as our facility is specially designed for horses.

Please feel free
to contact us!