For Veterinarians

Dear Colleagues, 

At Equinox Healthcare, we are committed to working closely with you to provide the best possible treatment for our mutual patients. We see our range of therapies as both a complement to and extension of your veterinary care. Therefore, we would like to stay in close contact with you even after the radiation therapy has been completed in order to support you in the aftercare, which is usually carried out by the referring vet.

Contact Form

If you have referred a patient, you are welcome to contact us directly or ask the owner to send us your contact details. In this case, you will receive a detailed report on the treatment that has taken place. 

Which patients are suitable
for radiation therapy?

The two main indications for radiation therapy are local tumours and chronic inflammatory diseases. 

Neoplasms are treated with a high total dose, which is divided into several individual fractions. The protocols of the so-called benign radiation, which is used for arthroses and other chronically painful indications, consist of fewer fractions with significantly lower doses. 

We also differentiate between curative and palliative radiation protocols. You are welcome to discuss with our veterinarians which protocol is suitable for the individual patient.

Information on etiology and the
treatment of common tumours

can be found in the info boxes on this page. Please note that this is only a selection of the most common indications; there are significantly more tumours that can be successfully treated with radiation therapy.

Equine Sarcoid

Equine sarcoids are the most common tumours in equines worldwide. They are caused by virus-induced degeneration of fibroblasts with various forms of proliferation. They rarely metastasize and are histologically classified as benign tumors. Surgical excision alone is often not sufficient because the tumours have enormous potential for recurrence. Their sometimes very large growth and often ulcerative character can lead to major local problems for the horses. Due to their clinical appearance, the tumours still often have to be classified as malignant.

Read more

The triggering viruses are the bovine papillomaviruses 1 and 2, which have adapted to horses over the years and are genetically different from the original cattle viruses. Until a few years ago, it was assumed that the infection in horses was abortive, i.e. that a horse as a “false host” could not infect other horses. However, immunohistological methods have shown that in many forms of sarcoids, intact viruses are emitted into the environment, thus proving there is a potential risk of infection from a horse with sarcoids. For BPV-1/-2 transmission to the next horse to lead to sarcoid formation, however, there must be injury to the epidermis to allow the virus to penetrate to the basal cell layer, and certain conditions must be met by the immune system of the new host.

In addition to surgery and the local application of ointments, which are frequently associated with relapses, radiation therapy is also available.

Melanoma

Grey horses have a significantly higher incidence of melanoma (= black skin cancer: heritability 0.36) than horses of a different colour since the mutation for the white coat colour is associated with other mutations. Grey horses are born as brown, black or fox-coloured foals and subsequently undergo a “too fast” greying process, with loss of melanocytes, due to a duplication mutation in intron 6 of the STX17 gene, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. With this colour mutation, further predispositions are also inherited, such as vitiligo (progressive, spotty skin depigmentation due to loss of melanocytes, especially in the areas around the mouth and eyes), and also a significantly increased incidence of melanomas. 

Read more

Melanomas often occur in different parts of the body in parallel and show slow but progressive growth. They can be life-limiting due to the increase in size, for example, coprostasis in the perianal area, or due to metastasis inwards, for example, the central nervous system. The success of surgical excision is usually not long-lasting since melanomas have microscopic cell extensions of about 3 cm in length, which prevent complete surgical tumour removal in most localizations and the melanomas recur after a short time. Oncept, the first so-called cancer vaccine for animals, is currently in the clinical trial phase. The systemic treatment with the histamine antagonist cimetidine has been used successfully in isolated cases, but there is no evidence-based basis for this to date. Radiation therapy can achieve good treatment success, especially in combination with surgical cytoreduction.

Squamous Cell
Carcinoma (SCC)

SCCs are malignant tumours from the group of carcinomas that originate in the epithelia of the skin and mucous membranes. Such tumours can also grow from other types of tissue that do not themselves have a squamous epithelium, but have epithelia with the ability to metaplasize squamous cells. SCCs grow infiltratively and spread across contiguous organ borders. In horses, SCCs usually metastasize only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this case, the regional lymph nodes are particularly affected. 

Read more

Squamous cell carcinomas account for 24.6% of all tumours in horses and are therefore the second most common tumours after equine sarcoids. The cause for the development of SCCs is multifactorial. Depending on the anatomical location, other factors come to the fore. A correlation between EcPV-2 and SCC of the penis was observed. Equine papillomaviruses are also believed to be an etiological agent for other localizations. UV light can lead to cell degeneration via the formation of thymidine dimers in DNA and RNA. Higher prevalence of SCCs in sunny areas has been demonstrated in equines. UV-light induced SCCs are particularly common on unpigmented skin and mucous membranes. There is also a breed predisposition in breeds with many markings, e.g. Appaloosa. Chronic inflammation, irritation and wounds promote the development of SCCs. 

Typical locations of SCCs in horses are the eye, especially the conjunctiva, cornea, sclera and the third eyelid. The external genitals, as well as the bladder neck, stomach (cardia), sinuses and pharynx/larynx are also affected.

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US!

If you have any questions about radiation therapy or would like to discuss a mutual patient with us, contact our veterinarians at any time by email or phone or by using the contact form.

For Veterinarians

Dear Colleagues, 

At Equinox Healthcare, we are committed to working closely with you to provide the best possible treatment for our mutual patients. We see our range of therapies as both a complement to and extension of your veterinary care. Therefore, we would like to stay in close contact with you even after the radiation therapy has been completed in order to support you in the aftercare, which is usually carried out by the referring vet.

CONTACT FORM

Which patients are suitable for radiation therapy?

The two main indications for radiation therapy are local tumours and chronic inflammatory diseases. 

Neoplasms are treated with a high total dose, which is divided into several individual fractions. The protocols of the so-called benign radiation, which is used for arthroses and other chronically painful indications, consist of fewer fractions with significantly lower doses. 

We also differentiate between curative and palliative radiation protocols. You are welcome to discuss with our veterinarians which protocol is suitable for the individual patient.

 

If you have referred a patient, you are welcome to contact us directly or ask the owner to send us your contact details. In this case, you will receive a detailed report on the treatment that has taken place. 

Information on etiology
and the treatment of
common tumours

can be found in the info boxes on this page. Please note that this is only a selection of the most common indications; there are significantly more tumours that can be successfully treated with radiation therapy.

Equine Sarcoid

Equine sarcoids are the most common tumours in equines worldwide. They are caused by virus-induced degeneration of fibroblasts with various forms of proliferation. They rarely metastasize and are histologically classified as benign tumors. Surgical excision alone is often not sufficient because the tumours have enormous potential for recurrence. Their sometimes very large growth and often ulcerative character can lead to major local problems for the horses. Due to their clinical appearance, the tumours still often have to be classified as malignant.

Read more

The triggering viruses are the bovine papillomaviruses 1 and 2, which have adapted to horses over the years and are genetically different from the original cattle viruses. Until a few years ago, it was assumed that the infection in horses was abortive, i.e. that a horse as a “false host” could not infect other horses. However, immunohistological methods have shown that in many forms of sarcoids, intact viruses are emitted into the environment, thus proving there is a potential risk of infection from a horse with sarcoids. For BPV-1/-2 transmission to the next horse to lead to sarcoid formation, however, there must be injury to the epidermis to allow the virus to penetrate to the basal cell layer, and certain conditions must be met by the immune system of the new host.

In addition to surgery and the local application of ointments, which are frequently associated with relapses, radiation therapy is also available.

Melanoma

Grey horses have a significantly higher incidence of melanoma (= black skin cancer: heritability 0.36) than horses of a different colour since the mutation for the white coat colour is associated with other mutations. Grey horses are born as brown, black or fox-coloured foals and subsequently undergo a “too fast” greying process, with loss of melanocytes, due to a duplication mutation in intron 6 of the STX17 gene, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. With this colour mutation, further predispositions are also inherited, such as vitiligo (progressive, spotty skin depigmentation due to loss of melanocytes, especially in the areas around the mouth and eyes), and also a significantly increased incidence of melanomas. 

Read more

Melanomas often occur in different parts of the body in parallel and show slow but progressive growth. They can be life-limiting due to the increase in size, for example, coprostasis in the perianal area, or due to metastasis inwards, for example, the central nervous system. The success of surgical excision is usually not long-lasting since melanomas have microscopic cell extensions of about 3 cm in length, which prevent complete surgical tumour removal in most localizations and the melanomas recur after a short time. Oncept, the first so-called cancer vaccine for animals, is currently in the clinical trial phase. The systemic treatment with the histamine antagonist cimetidine has been used successfully in isolated cases, but there is no evidence-based basis for this to date. Radiation therapy can achieve good treatment success, especially in combination with surgical cytoreduction.

Squamous Cell
Carcinoma (SCC)

SCCs are malignant tumours from the group of carcinomas that originate in the epithelia of the skin and mucous membranes. Such tumours can also grow from other types of tissue that do not themselves have a squamous epithelium, but have epithelia with the ability to metaplasize squamous cells. SCCs grow infiltratively and spread across contiguous organ borders. In horses, SCCs usually metastasize only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this case, the regional lymph nodes are particularly affected. 

Read more

Squamous cell carcinomas account for 24.6% of all tumours in horses and are therefore the second most common tumours after equine sarcoids. The cause for the development of SCCs is multifactorial. Depending on the anatomical location, other factors come to the fore. A correlation between EcPV-2 and SCC of the penis was observed. Equine papillomaviruses are also believed to be an etiological agent for other localizations. UV light can lead to cell degeneration via the formation of thymidine dimers in DNA and RNA. Higher prevalence of SCCs in sunny areas has been demonstrated in equines. UV-light induced SCCs are particularly common on unpigmented skin and mucous membranes. There is also a breed predisposition in breeds with many markings, e.g. Appaloosa. Chronic inflammation, irritation and wounds promote the development of SCCs. 

Typical locations of SCCs in horses are the eye, especially the conjunctiva, cornea, sclera and the third eyelid. The external genitals, as well as the bladder neck, stomach (cardia), sinuses and pharynx/larynx are also affected.

please
feel free to
contact us!

If you have any questions about radiation therapy or would like to discuss a mutual patient with us, contact our veterinarians at any time by email or phone or by using the contact form.

For Veterinarians

Dear Colleagues, 

At Equinox Healthcare, we are committed to working closely with you to provide the best possible treatment for our mutual patients. We see our range of therapies as both a complement to and extension of your veterinary care. Therefore, we would like to stay in close contact with you even after the radiation therapy has been completed in order to support you in the aftercare, which is usually carried out by the referring vet.

CONTACT FORM

If you have referred a patient, you are welcome to contact us directly or ask the owner to send us your contact details. In this case, you will receive a detailed report on the treatment that has taken place. 

Which patients are suitable for radiation therapy?

The two main indications for radiation therapy are local tumours and chronic inflammatory diseases. 

Neoplasms are treated with a high total dose, which is divided into several individual fractions. The protocols of the so-called benign radiation, which is used for arthroses and other chronically painful indications, consist of fewer fractions with significantly lower doses. 

We also differentiate between curative and palliative radiation protocols. You are welcome to discuss with our veterinarians which protocol is suitable for the individual patient.

Information on etiology and the treatment of common tumours

can be found in the info boxes on this page. Please note that this is only a selection of the most common indications; there are significantly more tumours that can be successfully treated with radiation therapy.

Equine Sarcoid

Equine sarcoids are the most common tumours in equines worldwide. They are caused by virus-induced degeneration of fibroblasts with various forms of proliferation. They rarely metastasize and are histologically classified as benign tumors. Surgical excision alone is often not sufficient because the tumours have enormous potential for recurrence. Their sometimes very large growth and often ulcerative character can lead to major local problems for the horses. Due to their clinical appearance, the tumours still often have to be classified as malignant.

Read more

The triggering viruses are the bovine papillomaviruses 1 and 2, which have adapted to horses over the years and are genetically different from the original cattle viruses. Until a few years ago, it was assumed that the infection in horses was abortive, i.e. that a horse as a “false host” could not infect other horses. However, immunohistological methods have shown that in many forms of sarcoids, intact viruses are emitted into the environment, thus proving there is a potential risk of infection from a horse with sarcoids. For BPV-1/-2 transmission to the next horse to lead to sarcoid formation, however, there must be injury to the epidermis to allow the virus to penetrate to the basal cell layer, and certain conditions must be met by the immune system of the new host.

In addition to surgery and the local application of ointments, which are frequently associated with relapses, radiation therapy is also available.

Melanoma

Grey horses have a significantly higher incidence of melanoma (= black skin cancer: heritability 0.36) than horses of a different colour since the mutation for the white coat colour is associated with other mutations. Grey horses are born as brown, black or fox-coloured foals and subsequently undergo a “too fast” greying process, with loss of melanocytes, due to a duplication mutation in intron 6 of the STX17 gene, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. With this colour mutation, further predispositions are also inherited, such as vitiligo (progressive, spotty skin depigmentation due to loss of melanocytes, especially in the areas around the mouth and eyes), and also a significantly increased incidence of melanomas. 

Read more

Melanomas often occur in different parts of the body in parallel and show slow but progressive growth. They can be life-limiting due to the increase in size, for example, coprostasis in the perianal area, or due to metastasis inwards, for example, the central nervous system. The success of surgical excision is usually not long-lasting since melanomas have microscopic cell extensions of about 3 cm in length, which prevent complete surgical tumour removal in most localizations and the melanomas recur after a short time. Oncept, the first so-called cancer vaccine for animals, is currently in the clinical trial phase. The systemic treatment with the histamine antagonist cimetidine has been used successfully in isolated cases, but there is no evidence-based basis for this to date. Radiation therapy can achieve good treatment success, especially in combination with surgical cytoreduction.

Squamous Cell
Carcinoma (SCC)

SCCs are malignant tumours from the group of carcinomas that originate in the epithelia of the skin and mucous membranes. Such tumours can also grow from other types of tissue that do not themselves have a squamous epithelium, but have epithelia with the ability to metaplasize squamous cells. SCCs grow infiltratively and spread across contiguous organ borders. In horses, SCCs usually metastasize only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this case, the regional lymph nodes are particularly affected. 

Read more

Squamous cell carcinomas account for 24.6% of all tumours in horses and are therefore the second most common tumours after equine sarcoids. The cause for the development of SCCs is multifactorial. Depending on the anatomical location, other factors come to the fore. A correlation between EcPV-2 and SCC of the penis was observed. Equine papillomaviruses are also believed to be an etiological agent for other localizations. UV light can lead to cell degeneration via the formation of thymidine dimers in DNA and RNA. Higher prevalence of SCCs in sunny areas has been demonstrated in equines. UV-light induced SCCs are particularly common on unpigmented skin and mucous membranes. There is also a breed predisposition in breeds with many markings, e.g. Appaloosa. Chronic inflammation, irritation and wounds promote the development of SCCs. 

Typical locations of SCCs in horses are the eye, especially the conjunctiva, cornea, sclera and the third eyelid. The external genitals, as well as the bladder neck, stomach (cardia), sinuses and pharynx/larynx are also affected.

please feel free
to contact us!

If you have any questions about radiation therapy or would like to discuss a mutual patient with us, contact our veterinarians at any time by email or phone or by using the contact form.